ACTIVE PRESENCE Performance by Mads Lynnerup
Plastic Gymnastic, part of the performance programme of PRESENCIA ACTIVA
ACTIVE PRESENCE Interview with Thom Kubli
Interview with Thom Kubli about his work Record Attempt, shown in the exhibition "Presencia activa"
ACTIVE PRESENCE Plastic Gymnastic at LABoral
Enrol in any of the activities that the instructors from Metropolitan will be teaching in this unique gym!
Image: Janite
ACTIVE PRESENCE Performance by Thom Kubli
Record Attempt, part of the performance programme at ACTIVE PRESENCEe
ACTIVE PRESENCE Sergio Prego
Born in San Sebastian, in 1696
ACTIVE PRESENCE Thom Kubli
Born in Frankfurt, Germany, 1969
Image: Marcos Morilla
ACTIVE PRESENCE Alastair MacLennan
Born in Blair Athol, Scotland, in 1934. Lives and works in Belfast
Image: Marcos Morilla
ACTIVE PRESENCE Infinite Jest, 2012
Installation and performance
Image: Janite
ACTIVE PRESENCE Laughing Hole, 2006
Installation and performance
ACTIVE PRESENCE Sin título, 2011
Installation and performance
Image: Janite
ACTIVE PRESENCE Record Attempt
Installation and performance
Image: Marcos Morilla
ACTIVE PRESENCE Vas-y!, 2005
Instalación and performance
Image: MARCO / Janite
ACTIVE PRESENCE Slogans Remix, 2012
Installation and performance
Image: MARCO / Janite
ACTIVE PRESENCE Residuo boca, 2012
Instalación y performance
Image: Archive of LABoral. Sergio Redruello
ACTIVE PRESENCE Lain Nail, 2012
Installation and performance
Image: Marcos Morilla
ACTIVE PRESENCE Plastic Gymnastic, 2012
Installation and performance
Image Marcos Morilla
ACTIVE PRESENCE Writing Corpora, 2011
Installation and performance
Image: MARCO / Janite
ACTIVE PRESENCE
05
Oct
2012
24
Feb
2013
Action, Object and Audience

ACTIVE PRESENCE

Action, Object and Audience

5
Oct
2012
24
Feb
2013

Everything about installation art’s structure and modus operandi repeatedly valorized the viewer’s first-hand presence – an insistence that ultimately reinstates the subject (as an unified entity), no matter how fragmented or dispersed our encounter with the art turns out to be. Perhaps more precisely, installation art instates the subject as a crucial component of the work – unlike body art, painting, film and so on, which (arguably) do not insist upon our physical presence in a space.

This paragraph embodies the main conclusion to which Claire Bishop arrives in her book Installation Art: A Critical History (2005). In this study, Bishop develops the reading of installation art since its beginnings in the 1930’s to this day based on the role the presence of the spectator takes – either physically or psychologically – within the work.

We can exchange, in this quote the word spectator for artist, and we can introduce performance instead of installation and thus, Bishop’s definition is equally relevant for Performance Art. Only the subject in this case would be the artist.

Until now, most of performance study was undertaken starting from its narrative development, while installation art research – as we see in Bishop’s book – was centered in the role of the spectator and the different ways he or she is activated by the art work.

This methodological disparity accounts for the fact that these two branches of contemporary art can be seen as a mirror image of each other. In fact, both are based in the principle of presence – of Active Presence. In performance art, it is the presence of the artist that is tantamount – in installation, the spectator. When reflected onto one another installation and performance art develop in divergent directions that are opposed but also superimposed, thus creating an axis between two poles. Along this axis are infinite possibilities of interaction. Performance becomes transitive.

ACTIVE PRESENCE: Action, Object and Audience is comprised of works – most of which are new productions specifically created for this show – that gain significance at this juncture. Its aim is the conflation of performance and installation into a diverse landscape of dynamic installations activated by the artists and/or the audience within the museum’s gallery walls. There are works in which the audience take a more passive role, while the artists are the activators. Conversely, there are also installations whose existence depends upon the participation of the public. There is work that also functions in both domains. In all is found a unique territory betwixt and between genres where conceptually layered relationships uncommon to the experience of pure performance or installation reside.

During October 5th and 6th the installations will be activated through different performances.

Performances Schedule [+]

 

Curated by: Sergio Edelsztein and Kathleen Forde

Artists: Maja Bajević, John Bock, Gary Hill, Thom Kubli, Mads Lynnerup, Alastair MacLennan, Sergio Prego, Gema Ramos, La Ribot, Carlos Rodríguez-Méndez, Nerea Santisteban, SUE-C + AGF

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Press kit 'Active Presence'

The exhibition includes works by 12 international artists that show the different possible relationships between performance and installation art

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  • 33394 Gijón (Asturias)
  • Spain
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